Learning Spanish: Begin By Listening – Part 1

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I remain convinced the main reason why so many Americans are attracted to Mexico is Gringolandia, or Gringo Expat Enclaves, they will never be faced with what seems to be the overwhelming task of learning Spanish. The British, I was told, do the same thing in the south of France. An expat intricate infrastructure and well organized awaits the aspiring retiree and relieves the fear of having to master the language. Everything is organized around the monolingual Gringo and negates any sort of need to learn Spanish.

If this is a good or bad thing, it does not fall within the scope of this series, "start listening." I personally think the point is, a "Gringolandia" should not even exist, but that's just me. I'm biased, I love learning Spanish! What can I say?

Two major advantages of learning Spanish, if you plan to retire in Mexico, are:

It could significantly increase your social status and the sense of community, if you were to socialize with more people than just the other gringos in Gringolandias. In Southeast Asia, the locals used to call this phenomenon "social incest." Americans, mostly those in the Foreign Service, would live in American enclaves and socialize only with each other. Their ability to mix with the locals was nonexistent because they did not know the language. Unlike their counterparts in the  Cold War, the Russians, the American Foreign Service workers were then, as they are today, not required to have any knowledge of the local language in the area. 

Not the same Gringolandia I mention in the article, but a funny one still! 

Without language, your social involvement is severely limited only to those who only speak "inglés". That can and must change, in my opinion. What do you think?

 

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